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Aug 09

Noah Syndergaard: About Last Night (8/8)

For all the good we’ve seen from Noah Syndergaard lately (in his previous seven starts, he’s allowed 31 hits in 50 innings while striking out 52!), last night, particularly that long first inning was a little hard to process. Wait a minute. The team gave you a 3-0 lead. What’s happening here?

Grady Sizemore happened. Then Kevin Kiermaier happened. And before Curt Casali mercifully grounded out to end that first inning, there were 38 pitches thrown, nearly half of those balls (15), and the Rays had taken a 4-3 lead. John Jaso hit the ball well on his leadoff double, and Sizemore (again with this guy) obviously hit one well, but James Loney’s single wasn’t hit exceptionally hard, and then three straight singles by Asdrubal Cabrera, Daniel Nava, and Kiermaier all were good at-bats but not belted across the park. Kiermaier’s single was just over Daniel Murphy’s head.

Sometimes things just happen.

Syndergaard was out of sink all night. His fastball was up, and he missed repeatedly away and just out of the zone. His curveball, a legitimate weapon, wasn’t sharp, and it more regularly ended two feet before home plate and needing to be blocked by Travis d’Arnaud. By the second inning, Syndergaard basically abandoned his curve, thrown it only eight more times the rest of the game (none in the second inning), and of those eight, I recall three of those used on backup catcher Rene Rivera in the fourth. He used his changeup more, mixing his speeds and getting Rays batters out that way.

It was just a struggle.

For this game, Syndergaard deserved better than the loss. Rightfully he should have walked out of there with a no decision. The run in the fifth was one manufactured by the Rays with a Jaso walk, a stolen base, and then he advanced to third on a wild pitch (another curveball in the dirt that d’Arnaud couldn’t handle. In d’Arndaud’s defense, he’d been blocking those pitches all night, so it wasn’t like he wasn’t capable. Yes, Ruben Tejada should have thrown Evan Longoria out at first on the slow grounder.

So it goes.

It wasn’t Syndergaard’s best by any stretch. He battled though. I’m sure he was equally as sick of seeing Longoria bat (three times in the first four innings) as I was. On the night, he allowed five earned runs on eight hits and two walks while striking out six. He hadn’t allowed a walk in his previous two outings, and the four innings were his shortest outing since his June 20th start against Atlanta.

Below I’ve listed the particulars for yesterday’s game.

Pitches by Type:

##  Pitch Type Count    %
##    Changeup    21 21.4
##   Curveball    20 20.4
##    Fourseam    56 57.1
##      Sinker     1 1.02

Pitch Type by Inning

##            1 2  3  4
## Changeup   2 9  4  6
## Curveball 12 0  2  6
## Fourseam  24 8 12 12
## Sinker     0 0  0  1

Pitches by Outcome:

##                     Changeup Curveball Fourseam Sinker
## Ball                      10         5       21      0
## Ball In Dirt               1         3        0      0
## Called Strike              3         5        8      0
## Foul                       4         2        8      1
## Foul (Runner Going)        0         0        2      0
## Foul Bunt                  0         0        1      0
## Foul Tip                   0         0        1      0
## In play, no out            0         1        4      0
## In play, out(s)            0         2        4      0
## In play, run(s)            1         0        2      0
## Swinging Strike            2         2        5      0

Events by Final Pitch of At-Bat

##           Changeup Curveball Fourseam
## Double           0         0        1
## Flyout           0         0        3
## Groundout        0         1        1
## Home Run         0         0        1
## Pop Out          0         1        0
## Single           1         1        4
## Strikeout        1         2        3
## Walk             0         0        2

Strikeouts by Description

##                 Changeup Curveball Fourseam
## Called Strike          0         1        0
## Swinging Strike        1         1        3

Strikeouts by Batter

##     Batter Name Strikeout(s)
##   Evan  Longoria            2
##  Grady  Sizemore            1
##     James  Loney            1
##  Logan  Forsythe            1
##     Rene  Rivera            1

Pitches Velocities & Movement:

##  Pitch Type  Min Mean  Max Mean Hor Mean Vert CRT Mean Hor CRT Mean Vert
##    Changeup 84.9 86.7 88.1   -6.183     5.539       -6.309         4.055
##   Curveball 77.3 80.6 83.2    10.06  -0.04400        10.52        -1.817
##    Fourseam 94.8 96.4 98.2   -2.117     11.86       -2.113         10.54
##      Sinker 96.0 96.0 96.0   -6.060     9.210       -6.443         7.821

Note: Horizontal movement denotes average distance, in inches, from point of release to home plate (+ moves away from a right-handed batter) while vertical movement is average distance, in inches, from release point to home plate. As measured from the corner of home plate, the x-axis (horizontal) runs to the catcher’s right, the y-axis points at the pitcher, and the z-axis (vertical) runs up and down.

Note 2: The corrected horizontal and vertical are based upon a paper by Alan M. Nathan from the University of Illinois and account for the elimination of both gravity and drag. The corrected averages more accurately reflect the true movement of the baseball.

Average (MPH) Velocity for Pitches by Starters Last Night:

2015-08-09_Noah Syndergaard_BoxPlotBelow are the pitch locations by both batter stance (left or right) and by pitch type.

Pitch Location by Stance:

2015-08-09_Noah Syndergaard_Stance

Pitch Location by Pitch Type:

2015-08-09_Noah Syndergaard_Pitches

Pitch Locations by Batter:

2015-08-09_Noah Syndergaard_Batters

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