Aug 13

Jacob deGrom: About Last Night (August 12)

I feel like I need to defend Jacob deGrom’s (11-6) outing. As though his two hits allowed over seven dominant innings isn’t enough defense to his title as Best Right-Handed Starter on the East Coast with Long Hair. With another few outings like Wednesday night, best starter in the major leagues isn’t out of grasp. Maybe there are a few guys in D.C. and over in Los Angeles (and Chicago, and Cleveland, etc.) that have a thing or two to say about that, but the larger point is that deGrom is every bit as good as billed.

The justification comes in when I look over the numbers and see those four walks. During the game, they didn’t mean all that much to me. So he walked Carlos Gonzalez (always a good idea anyway) and Ben Paulsen in the sixth. Did you see him blow away DJ LeMahieu with a 96-mph fastball? He added a little trouble on top of bad in the fifth with a walk to Michael McKenry after the LeMahieu double. That’s okay. He strikes out Brandon Barnes on three pitches, gets a gift out on a bunt, then threw a 97-mph fastball past Charlie Blackmon that was both unhittable and sort of funny to watch.

I guffawed.

In my mind I remember quite a few three ball counts, but there weren’t. There were the walks, of course, and a 3-2 count to Blackmon in the fifth. That’s it. I want to defend because on a day where Hisashi Iwakuma threw a no-hitter and Clayton Kershaw carried a perfect game into the sixth inning, I enjoyed deGrom’s outing the most. Every bit of that outing had the feel of a guy with his good repertoire and willing to show it.

That’s misleading too. He barely threw his slider, and one of these days he’s going to throw that changeup more. He threw one to Jose Reyes in the third that I’m still giggling over. deGrom didn’t need to throw those pitches. His fastball was basically untouchable all night. If he wasn’t going up and getting the Rockies batters to bite he was painting the outside corner by the knees. Ask Nolan Arenado how he feels about that. His curveball was the best I’ve seen from him in a while, which is sort of saying something.

A 3-0 game. Once the Mets scored the first run on Juan Uribe’s double I was happy. deGrom wasn’t allowing a run last night.

The raw numbers show deGrom throwing seven innings, walking four, striking out 10, and allowing two hits. There was one tough inning, only one hard hit ball that I remember, and a lot of sullen looks.

Below I’ve listed the particulars for yesterday’s game.

Pitches by Type:

##  Pitch Type Count    %
##    Changeup    10 9.71
##   Curveball    14 13.6
##    Fourseam    51 49.5
##    Two-seam    26 25.2
##      Slider     2 1.94

Pitch Type by Inning

##           1  2 3 4  5  6 7
## Changeup  1  1 2 2  0  4 0
## Curveball 3  1 2 2  1  4 1
## Fourseam  6 10 1 6 13 12 3
## Two-seam  5  3 4 1  2  6 5
## Slider    0  0 0 1  0  1 0

Pitches by Outcome:

##                           Changeup Curveball Fourseam Two-seam Slider
## Ball                             4         6       17        6      1
## Called Strike                    0         2        7        7      1
## Foul                             1         1       10        7      0
## Foul Tip                         0         0        1        0      0
## In play, no out                  0         1        0        1      0
## In play, out(s)                  3         0        4        4      0
## Swinging Strike                  2         2       12        1      0
## Swinging Strike (Blocked)        0         2        0        0      0

Events by Final Pitch of At-Bat

##                Changeup Curveball Fourseam Two-seam Slider
## Bunt Groundout        0         0        1        0      0
## Double                0         0        0        1      0
## Flyout                1         0        0        0      0
## Forceout              0         0        0        1      0
## Groundout             2         0        1        2      0
## Lineout               0         0        0        1      0
## Pop Out               0         0        1        0      0
## Sac Bunt              0         0        1        0      0
## Single                0         1        0        0      0
## Strikeout             0         2        6        2      0
## Walk                  0         0        3        0      1

Strikeouts by Description

##                           Curveball Fourseam Two-seam
## Called Strike                     0        0        1
## Foul Tip                          0        1        0
## Swinging Strike                   0        5        1
## Swinging Strike (Blocked)         2        0        0

Strikeouts by Batter

##       Batter Name Strikeout(s)
##       Ben  Paulsen            1
##    Brandon  Barnes            2
##   Carlos  Gonzalez            1
##  Charlie  Blackmon            1
##       DJ  LeMahieu            2
##  Jorge  De  La  Rosa            1
##      Matt  McBride            1
##     Nolan  Arenado            1

Pitches Velocities & Movement:

##  Pitch Type  Min Mean  Max Mean Hor Mean Vert CRT Mean Hor CRT Mean Vert
##    Changeup 84.2 86.3 88.0   -6.962     3.175       -6.901         1.696
##   Curveball 78.9 80.7 82.8    5.219    -4.016        5.550        -5.782
##    Fourseam 93.8 95.7 97.3   -4.246     8.902       -3.871         7.777
##    Two-seam 87.1 94.5 97.8   -7.678     5.741       -7.602         4.508
##      Slider 88.1 88.6 89.1    1.590     1.945        2.296        0.3962

Note: Horizontal movement denotes average distance, in inches, from point of release to home plate (+ moves away from a right-handed batter) while vertical movement is average distance, in inches, from release point to home plate. As measured from the back point of home plate, the x-axis (horizontal) runs to the catcher’s right, the y-axis points at the pitcher, and the z-axis (vertical) runs upward.

Note 2: The corrected horizontal and vertical are based upon a paper by Alan M. Nathan from the University of Illinois and account for the elimination of both gravity and drag. The corrected averages more accurately reflect the true movement of the baseball.

Average (MPH) Velocity for Pitches by Starters Last Night:

2015-08-13_Jacob DeGrom_BoxPlot

Below are the pitch locations by both batter stance (left or right) and by pitch type.

Pitch Location by Stance:

2015-08-13_Jacob DeGrom_Stance

Pitch Location by Pitch Type:

2015-08-13_Jacob DeGrom_Pitches

Pitch Locations by Batter:

2015-08-13_Jacob DeGrom_Batters

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