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Sep 11

Bartolo Colon: About Last Night (September 10)

I was being a little goofy when I compared Bartolo Colon (14-11) to Dwight Gooden. At the time, Colon’s scoreless streak had reached 16 consecutive innings, which of course was Gooden’s jersey number. I don’t find signs in numbers or react with a start every time I see 7-11, but the Colon Gooden associations keep popping up in my head. After last night’s start in Atlanta, Colon tied Gooden for the third longest consecutive scoreless inning streak in Mets history at 31, and now the Mets magic number to clinch the division is 16. I also looked for a Gooden/Colon connection batting, maybe one where Colon’s eight hits matched Gooden, and Gooden did have eight hits in 1989.

Gooden also had 21 hits in 1985, 19 in 1992, and owned a career .197 batting line with seven home runs. Gooden could really hit.

I mention all of this because in the fourth inning Colon had a two out RBI single to extend the team’s lead to 3-0. It was a sharply hit single to centerfield. Perhaps we should now stop treating each of Colon’s hits as historical oddities and consider him a legitimate threat in the lineup? Okay, I’m not going to go that far. I got caught up in some Mets fever right there. Moving along.

How about the run Kelly Johnson is on? He pinch hits in Wednesday’s game and delivers a huge home run off the dominant Stephen Strasburg. Then, on Thursday, he starts out his night with a double to left that is just out of Nick Swisher’s diving reach, and in his second at-bat he records a check swing infield single. With that combination of luck and skill, he should be heading to Vegas as quickly as possible.

Just win, baby!

Terry Collins is on a great run of his own, right? He inserts Kirk Nieuwenhuis into Tuesday’s game and the lefty hits a go ahead pinch-hit home run off of Jonathan Papelbon, and he pinch-hit Johnson for Wilmer Flores Wednesday, and on Thursday he gives David Wright the night off for Juan Uribe, and Uribe goes 3-for-4 with three RBI with his RBI single in the seventh proving particularly important as Colon allowed two runs in the bottom half of the inning. If Collins and Johnson are hosting a poker game, run from that table as quickly as possible. Even Michael Jordan would run from that game.

As for Colon’s night, seeing as that’s what we’re here to discuss, he continued to use his changeup more as we’ve noticed over his last few starts. He wasn’t particularly spectacular in this start. I don’t recall any pitches that defied the laws of physics, unlike in other starts, but he was fortunate to have the Braves hit the ball to Michael Conforto in left field who was able to sprint to the warning track. Flores made a great diving play on a Nick Markakis grounder, and Lucas Duda turned a sweet double-play.

Colon pitched up in the zone more, which ended up costing him the seventh when Jace Peterson tripled in Swisher for the Braves first run. The run stopped Colon’s scoreless streak at 31, and according to the guys at Just Mets that’s a new record for pitchers 42 years or older. Also, in other notes on Colon, I’m taking this straight from the AP:

Since receiving no decision in New York’s 14-9 loss at Colorado on Aug. 21, Colon is 5-0 with four walks and 23 strikeouts in stretch of 31 2/3 innings that includes four starts and one relief appearance. He is 13-1 with a 2.52 ERA in 14 starts against NL East opponents this year.

So, on the night, Colon tossed 6 2/3 innings and allowed two earned runs on seven hits and one walk while striking out two.

Below I’ve listed the particulars for yesterday’s game.

Pitches by Type:

##  Pitch Type Count    %
##    Changeup    15  16.
##    Fourseam    19 20.2
##    Two-seam    53 56.4
##      Slider     7 7.45

Pitch Type by Inning

##           1 2 3 4 5 6  7
## Changeup  4 0 2 2 0 6  1
## Fourseam  3 1 1 3 7 1  3
## Two-seam 12 9 8 3 6 5 10
## Slider    0 2 2 0 0 0  3

Pitches by Outcome:

##                 Changeup Fourseam Two-seam Slider
## Ball                   4        6       17      1
## Ball In Dirt           1        0        0      0
## Called Strike          0        4       11      2
## Foul                   4        4       10      1
## In play, no out        1        1        1      2
## In play, out(s)        3        1       12      1
## In play, run(s)        1        0        1      0
## Swinging Strike        1        3        1      0

Events by Final Pitch of At-Bat

##                  Changeup Fourseam Two-seam Slider
## Flyout                  1        0        4      1
## Forceout                0        0        1      0
## Grounded Into DP        1        0        0      0
## Groundout               1        1        2      0
## Lineout                 0        0        4      0
## Pop Out                 0        0        1      0
## Single                  1        1        2      2
## Strikeout               0        2        0      0
## Triple                  1        0        0      0
## Walk                    1        0        0      0

Pitches by Zone Location

##  Zone % Out of Zone % O-Swing % Z-Swing %
##   55.32         44.68     26.86     61.46

Note: Zone % is the number of pitches thrown that were considered in the strike zone; Out of Zone is the number of pitches thrown out of the strike zone; and O-Swing % and Z-Swing % relate to those pitches out of the zone and in the zone that were swung at by batters.

Calculations: I calculated the strike zone based upon the formula provided by Mike Fast in a post for Baseball Prospectus. O-Swing % = Swings at Pitches Out of the Zone / Total Pitches Out of the Zone, and Z-Swing % = Swings at Pitches In the Zone / Total Pitches In the Zone. Fangraphs has a great explanation regarding plate discipline, and I encourage you to read about it if you get a chance. After enjoying my site first, of course.


Pitch Types by Zone Location

##  Pitch Type In Zone Out of Zone O-Swing % Z-Swing %
##    Changeup       5          10     0.500     0.800
##    Fourseam      11           8     0.250     0.636
##    Two-seam      32          21     0.190     0.625
##      Slider       4           3     0.333     0.750

Strikeouts by Description

##                 Fourseam
## Swinging Strike        2

Standard Batting Lines Against Bartolo Colon

##             Batter PA AB H 2B 3B HR K BB HBP SF    BA   OBP   SLG Pitches
##    A.J.  Pierzynski  3  3 1  0  0  0 0  0   0  0 0.333 0.333 0.333       9
##      Adonis  Garcia  1  1 0  0  0  0 0  0   0  0 0.000 0.000 0.000       4
##  Andrelton  Simmons  3  3 2  0  0  0 0  0   0  0 0.667 0.667 0.667       6
##  Frederick Freeman  3  2 1  0  0  0 0  1   0  0 0.500 0.667 0.500      16
##     Hector  Olivera  3  3 1  0  0  0 0  0   0  0 0.333 0.333 0.333       9
##      Jace  Peterson  3  3 1  0  1  0 0  0   0  0 0.333 0.333 1.000       9
##      Michael  Bourn  3  3 0  0  0  0 0  0   0  0 0.000 0.000 0.000       8
##      Nick  Markakis  3  3 0  0  0  0 0  0   0  0 0.000 0.000 0.000       9
##       Nick  Swisher  3  3 1  0  0  0 1  0   0  0 0.333 0.333 0.333      15
##      Shelby  Miller  2  2 0  0  0  0 1  0   0  0 0.000 0.000 0.000       9

Pitches Velocities & Movement:

##  Pitch Type  Min Mean  Max Mean Hor Mean Vert CRT Mean Hor CRT Mean Vert
##    Changeup 79.6 81.3 82.9   -7.933     4.393       -7.707         3.070
##    Fourseam 87.2 90.0 92.1   -4.775     8.865       -4.715         7.930
##    Two-seam 83.3 86.4 89.1   -8.861     5.038       -8.673         3.970
##      Slider 78.6 80.9 82.8   0.7414    0.5657        1.325       -0.7643

Note: Horizontal movement denotes average distance, in inches, from point of release to home plate (+ moves away from a right-handed batter) while vertical movement is average distance, in inches, from release point to home plate. As measured from the back point of home plate, the x-axis (horizontal) runs to the catcher’s right, the y-axis points at the pitcher, and the z-axis (vertical) runs upward.

Note 2: The corrected horizontal and vertical are based upon a paper by Alan M. Nathan from the University of Illinois nd account for the elimination of both gravity and drag. The corrected averages more accurately reflect the true movement of the baseball.


Average (MPH) Velocity for Pitches by Starters Last Night:

2015-09-11_Bartolo Colon_BoxPlot

Below are the pitch locations by both batter stance (left or right) and by pitch type.

Pitch Location by Stance:

2015-09-11_Bartolo Colon_Stance

Pitch Location by Pitch Type:

2015-09-11_Bartolo Colon_Pitches

Pitch Locations by Batter:

2015-09-11_Bartolo Colon_Batters

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